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Psoas - what else can it do?
alliedsofttissue
alliedsofttissue
Joined: Thu, Apr 6 2006
Location: Victoria
Posts: 115
RE: Psoas - what else can it do?
Tue, Jul 05 2016 11:18 PM

Daisy,

I could not agree more, on the vast majority of people it can be palpated, perhaps not easily like a gastroc but with skilled hands and the right training, not that hard.

Most if not all cadavers that I saw were so lean (old people) that it actually reinforced my perception of what I was able to palpate.

AST


Concordia res parvae crescent


Daisy
Daisy
Joined: Sat, Jun 16 2007
Location: NSW
Posts: 50
RE: Psoas - what else can it do?
Wed, Feb 26 2014 6:38 AM

Errol, the Psoas is soooooo simple to palpate.
I'm not sure where you learnt your trade but I would go back and get some more.
With a little tuition is quite easy to touch the front of someones L4, L5 and the top of the sacrum, hence the psoas is a complete breeze.

everyone who claims to be an RMT should be highly skilled at this palpation. If not, you haven't been taught right.


errolprowse
Joined: Sun, Nov 25 2012
Location: california
Posts: 9
RE: Psoas - what else can it do?
Sun, Nov 25 2012 8:02 AM

I do not trust my palpating skills to reach that deep. Every time I did cadaver work in school I would look at how deep the psoas is and thought "that is impossible to really reach". I am not doubting your guys skill, but that muscle is SO very deep, it is so hard to imagine that it is palpable.

I find that stretches that stretch the fascia train associated with the psoas muscles releases it just fine. These stretches are in the "ming method", which you stretch every muscle in a kinect chain, at the same time, to release the fascia.

I personally hate stretching if the tissue is dysfunctional (because it can cause more damage), but I think of the psoas as untouchable, and if you follow a stretching protocol that addresses only the fascia, the tissues will not be damaged further.

Check out ming method, he has some great techniques on how to do this


Check out my soft tissue website: www.pain-geek.com


notsobiggins
Joined: Wed, Jul 25 2007
Posts: 50
RE: Psoas - what else can it do?
Fri, Dec 16 2011 3:35 PM

Considering most of Bogduk stuff is in isoloation I don't think any of it can be objectively used in situ. Plus, how can one objectively even conceive what the psoas does in situ, let alone in dynamic movement - gait. Multiple joints, all planes. Crazy to even suggest one specific movement.
I'm leaning towards a synergist at best in most movements and a stabiliser in all movements.


inquisitive
inquisitive
Joined: Wed, May 24 2006
Location: Brisvegas
Posts: 443
RE: Psoas - what else can it do?
Thu, May 13 2010 9:30 AM

Daisy, I doubt whether a spasming psoas ( due to a lumbar facet irritation) would pull the iliolumbar region in any one direction. It would merely restrict movement by creating greater stiffness about the region. A local muscle spasm due to joint irritation is to restrict movement and provide an environment of reduced joint irritation - not to pull the joint in any direction.


keep it simple stupid


ColinRossie
Joined: Wed, Apr 25 2007
Location: Sydney
Posts: 175
RE: Psoas - what else can it do?
Thu, May 06 2010 1:55 PM

inquisitive Wrote:
Has anyone considered that psoas might become hypertonic as a result of irritated lumbar facets?


Yep, no less a luminary than Nikolai Bogduk has (among others, such as Gracovetsky and the Dutch crowd)


"One of the penalties for refusing to participate in politics is that you end up being governed by your inferiors" Plato


ThePhantom
ThePhantom
Joined: Fri, Jul 28 2006
Posts: 118
RE: Psoas - what else can it do?
Wed, May 05 2010 9:23 PM

GregDaily Wrote:
It is well written that both psoas and piriformis perform more of a stabilising role than a dynamic role. No surprises there. Poor education at a biomechanical level leads to this form of debate. Learn your physiology and read some research papers.


You're a crack up Mr (Mrs?) Daly ... Are you a Myo !


I love to doubt as well as know.


Daisy
Daisy
Joined: Sat, Jun 16 2007
Location: NSW
Posts: 50
RE: Psoas - what else can it do?
Tue, May 04 2010 1:28 PM

If a Lumbar facet was damaged (lets say degeneration) what position would the psoas pull it into or hold it in?


inquisitive
inquisitive
Joined: Wed, May 24 2006
Location: Brisvegas
Posts: 443
RE: Psoas - what else can it do?
Mon, May 03 2010 11:17 PM

Has anyone considered that psoas might become hypertonic as a result of irritated lumbar facets?
Hence, reducing psoas spasm would decrease the protective spasm that has reflexly occured to limit further facet damage?
Think of the position of the lumbar spine and where the facets would be irritated....


keep it simple stupid


fejsi
fejsi
Joined: Thu, Jun 21 2007
Posts: 67
RE: Psoas - what else can it do?
Sat, Apr 03 2010 5:12 PM

Thanks for providing that link Colin. I got a lot out of it.

It reinforced some of my thinking and opened up some new thinking for me. Which i know is why you put it out there. Ill read it again.

I look forward to Gregs article too! Let us know when he submits it. I think his should be linked here at STT too if he is ok with it.


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